(Source: cute-overload)

texasenchantment:

The fact that I’m legally an adult is hysterical

gabifresh:

take no shit 2014

(Source: gatissed)

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

yumeharanozomi:

the world's ten happiest countries

kropotkink:

My attitude towards politics and society is constantly “angry but unsurprised”

(Source: rosaluxmemeburg)

nobraska:

this is me


That dog in front of you doesn’t want to bite you. Even if the situation pushes him beyond the remarkable scope of his species’ tolerance for human behavior and makes him feel he needs to defend himself, he almost certainly doesn’t want to hurt you and probably won’t. This is partly because it’s often obvious, even to humans, when a dog is saying, “I need you to stop that!” or “You’re freaking me out. Please go away.” It’s also because dogs have evolved better abilities to read human body language than any other non-human animal and are emotionally inclined to form attachments with us.
In the billions of interactions people in this country have every day with the more than 73 million dogs living among us, very few result in significant injuries to either of us,[1]vanishingly fewer than those resulting from our dealings with our own species. Remarkable when you think that we’ve chosen to share our lives and homes with predators—sometimes pretty large ones—with sharp teeth.
Just a little instruction can help us learn to recognize dogs’ “please don’t make me bite you”[*]messages when they are uneasy with us and to defuse those emotions even in situations that dogs commonly find threatening. [x]

That dog in front of you doesn’t want to bite you. Even if the situation pushes him beyond the remarkable scope of his species’ tolerance for human behavior and makes him feel he needs to defend himself, he almost certainly doesn’t want to hurt you and probably won’t. This is partly because it’s often obvious, even to humans, when a dog is saying, “I need you to stop that!” or “You’re freaking me out. Please go away.” It’s also because dogs have evolved better abilities to read human body language than any other non-human animal and are emotionally inclined to form attachments with us.

In the billions of interactions people in this country have every day with the more than 73 million dogs living among us, very few result in significant injuries to either of us,[1]vanishingly fewer than those resulting from our dealings with our own species. Remarkable when you think that we’ve chosen to share our lives and homes with predators—sometimes pretty large ones—with sharp teeth.

Just a little instruction can help us learn to recognize dogs’ “please don’t make me bite you”[*]messages when they are uneasy with us and to defuse those emotions even in situations that dogs commonly find threatening. [x]

(Source: animalethics)

if you ever think it is ever acceptable to say that “_____ should die”, “kill all ____”, “its not murder if they’re _____” to any group, for any reason, unfollow me. 

You can dislike a group, hate a group, whatever. But if you think its acceptable or god forbid, funny to wish death on someone, you’re being a terrible person.

(Source: angryginger)

(Source: youtube.com)

betabait:

nitoriaiichirou:

skramztier:

dingyfeathers:

lmao thank god someone made this.

you watch your mouth, macaroons are delicious

macaroons are gods gift to earth u keep ur fucking pastel soap biscuits at the kiddies table 

In Scotland we have “macaroon bars” which are essentially bars of pure sugar covered in chocolate and desiccated coconut. Diabetes never looked so twee

These bear no similarity to anything else referred to as “macaroon” and I cannot for the life of me find out why they’re named this. My best guess was that when they first made these they needed a classier name than “coconut-covered diabetes” 

betabait:

nitoriaiichirou:

skramztier:

dingyfeathers:

lmao thank god someone made this.

you watch your mouth, macaroons are delicious

macaroons are gods gift to earth u keep ur fucking pastel soap biscuits at the kiddies table 

In Scotland we have “macaroon bars” which are essentially bars of pure sugar covered in chocolate and desiccated coconut. Diabetes never looked so twee

These bear no similarity to anything else referred to as “macaroon” and I cannot for the life of me find out why they’re named this. My best guess was that when they first made these they needed a classier name than “coconut-covered diabetes” 

(Source: mykingdomscome)